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✤ [Download] ➼ Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang By Ann Pearlman ➶ – Hookupgoldmilf.info

Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang

Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang A Memoir Of The Author's Life As A Crip-beginning At The Tender Age Of Ten In The Mid-seventies-and His Prison Turnaround Nearly Twenty-five Years Later

www.annpearlman.net

✤ [Download] ➼ Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang By Ann Pearlman ➶ – Hookupgoldmilf.info
  • Hardcover
  • 323 pages
  • Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang
  • Ann Pearlman
  • English
  • 06 March 2018
  • 9780312329297

10 thoughts on “Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang

  1. says:

    You can't blame other people for crimes you're guilty of yourself!

    ‘Inside the Crips’ is such a difficult book to review because even as I start typing I still don’t know if it deserves a 5 Star or a 3 Star. “Give it a 4 Star then,” I hear you shout. No, I can’t sit on the fence like that. It deserves a 5 Star because Colton Simpson has without a doubt written an engaging tale with complete candour and integrity.

    After growing up on the streets of South-Central Los Angeles, being ‘initiated’ into the Crips at 10 years of age, shooting people, robbing jewellery stores, shooting more people, robbing more jewellery stores and spending more than a decade in some of the toughest prisons in America where war between Blacks, Mexicans, Whites, Bloods and even separate Crip sections is an ongoing source of violence and death he’s come full circle. But – and this is a huge BUT – he’s such a bloody racist, and I just can’t offer a racist a 5 Star review.

    I detest racism of any kind. I hate the ignorance of it. I’ve worked with tough Poles, lazy Somalians, hard-working Lithuanians and Bulgarians, friendly Romanians, fun-loving Sikhs and quiet Muslims. And I absolutely despise and abhor the kind of racism that Simpson, or Li’l Cee Loc, preaches so openly in this book.

    “My people are still enslaved by the White race.” No they're not. They’re enslaved by themselves. They chose to commit those crimes. And your people, my arse! What does that mean? In the book you claim it’s the Black man. That would be the Black man that’s spent decades shooting and killing other Black men, I suppose. Yeah right, your people …..

    And what is this White Race? Hungarian? Romanian? Italian? Lithuania? Scottish? Which race? White isn’t a race, Colton Simpson, it’s a colour. How can you apportion blame onto ALL people of a white colour? How is it the white man’s fault?

    “At last the system has turned me from a human being to just another number.” Not really, Li’l Cee. Your own CHOICES turned you from a human being to just another number. Really, does society deserve to have to put up with the likes of Li’l Cee Loc?

    “1.6 percent of White men between 20 and 34 are in prison (Simpson’s figures not mine), 12 percent of Black men 20 to 34 are in prison. My people are still enslaved.” They’re your figures Simpson and they speak for themselves, don’t they? I checked out some other stats. Black people make up about 30% of the population of the United States, and 60% of the prison population. Now regardless of whom you committed your crimes against society had decided that it had earned a well-deserved rest from your activities. It had absolutely nothing to do with the colour of anybody’s skin.

    “Judge Cecil J. Mills peers over his glasses and says, ‘Well now Mr Simpson. Don’t you dare look at me like that,’” and Li’l Cee honestly doesn’t understand how the judge thinks he’s being antagonistic. But I understand it. Li’l Cee’s look is common to the streets of South-Central L.A., in particular the areas of Compton, Watts and Inglewood. And I know that because in the early eighties I worked that area as a White English cab driver. I possibly know more about those areas and the people who live in them than any other Englishman alive.

    And I’ll tell you something for nothing. They were such a miserable crowd, not giving a toss about manners, respectability or even cleanliness. Their homes were greasy, foul and noxious, their personalities were out for the count, and they never, ever smiled. The only thing that came close to a smile would be a derisory snigger or a mocking catcall. And they had such a chip on their shoulders. Always bitching about how the white man had screwed them over.

    And that may be true. Black people definitely had a raw deal in the old slavery days, but no small measure of irony creeps in here when we realize that the Moors - Muslims who eventually settled in North-West Africa - laid waste the coasts of Europe, taking slaves that were sold in the markets of Venice. In the early 9th century the Vikings took over the slave trade - the word commemorates the fate of the Slavic people - and sold them to rich Muslims in the Eastern Mediterranean. But Muslims were the world's first slave traders. I only speak the truth.

    However, the way that Black people were treated in the south of America in the 50’s and 60’s was disgusting. But Native Americans and Jews have been treated far, far worse over the centuries, and you don’t hear them whinging about it, do you?

    Coloured people really don’t do themselves any favours by turning the neighbourhoods they live in, in whatever city of the world they happen to be, into trouble spots and danger areas. It’s a well-documented fact that a large proportion of the crime in London, Paris, New York and Los Angeles is focused around the Black communities.

    Why is this? Are White people to blame? Of course not. For if that were the case then the Jewish sections in countries like Russia and Germany would also be ‘no-go’ areas where prostitution, drugs and homicide are a daily form of misery, fear and death.

    When Pulitzer prize-winning writer, Edwin Way Teale, wrote in 1953 that, “It is not races but individuals that are noble and courageous or ignoble and craven or considerate or persistent or philosophical or reasonable,” what he was really saying was that a whole race of otherwise well-adjusted, well-dressed and well-read people get the blame when a high percentage of their individuals are troublesome.

    But why are a high percentage of their individuals troublesome? I don’t know. It’s just the way they are. Lack of effective role models as parents probably has a lot to do with it. But it’s not my fault, is it?

    I’ve learned that there are a group of people, those who are so racist, so bigoted, so locked inside their own tiny little box of hate that the only way to deal with it is to accuse OTHER people of being racist.

    A small portion of the ethnic minorities living in England and the USA have such a narrow focus that, for whatever reason, they live in a permanent state of hostility towards the (quote) White race (unquote). They may well have suffered trauma and persecution, but this has warped their mind-set and psyche to such an extent that they now hold ALL White people accountable for ill treatment their ancestors may have previously suffered, ever on the look-out for any imagined sign of abuse.

    The persecuted has become so twisted that he has swapped places and is now himself the persecutor, intolerant of all White members of the community. These people who habitually fill their own minds with the rank poisons of hatred, suspicion and jealousy can get very upset at those who refuse to do likewise, and they find a perverted relief in actually accusing THEM of being racist, when of course it is the reciprocal outlook that is the truth.

    Interesting how the perspective changes with the point of view, isn’t it?

    So while this really is an excellent book and a fascinating read as we follow Simpson’s spirited, brave and it has to said foolhardy journey from Colton-to-Li’l Cee-to-Cee Loc-to-Colton again as he comes full circle and shares his campaign with us I just can’t give a racist a 5 Star.

    This is one of the best books I’ve read about the Bloods and Crips, but with regret – for I believe Simpson to be, and to have always been, a very principled human being - I can only afford it a 3 Star.

  2. says:

    This was the most interesting book I had ever read. There's like non-stop action in this book. This book retain alot of action from when he was young until he was older. Check this book out it is really good. Jonas Williams 14 years old

  3. says:

    ‘Inside the Crips’ is such a difficult book to review because even as I start typing I still don’t know if it deserves a 5 Star or a 3 Star. “Give it a 4 Star then,” I hear you shout. No, I can’t sit on the fence like that. It deserves a 5 Star because Colton Simpson has without a doubt written an engaging tale with complete candour and integrity.

    After growing up on the streets of South-Central Los Angeles, being ‘initiated’ into the Crips at 10 years of age, shooting people, robbing jewellery stores, shooting more people, robbing more jewellery stores and spending more than a decade in some of the toughest prisons in America where war between Blacks, Mexicans, Whites, Bloods and even separate Crip sections is an ongoing source of violence and death he’s come full circle. But – and this is a huge BUT – he’s such a bloody racist, and I just can’t offer a racist a 5 Star review.

    I detest racism of any kind. I hate the ignorance of it. I’ve worked with tough Poles, lazy Somalians, hard-working Lithuanians and Bulgarians, friendly Romanians, fun-loving Sikhs and quiet Muslims. And I absolutely despise and abhor the kind of racism that Simpson, or Li’l Cee Loc, preaches so openly in this book.

    “My people are still enslaved by the White race.” No their not. They’re enslaved by themselves. They chose to commit those crimes. And your people, my arse! What does that mean? In the book you claim it’s the Black man. That would be the Black man that’s spent decades shooting and killing other Black men, I suppose. Yeah right, your people …..

    And what is this White Race? Hungarian? Romanian? Italian? Lithuania? Scottish? Which race? White isn’t a race, Colton Simpson, it’s a colour. How can you apportion blame onto ALL people of a white colour? How is it the white man’s fault?

    “At last the system has turned me from a human being to just another number.” Not really, Li’l Cee. Your own CHOICES turned you from a human being to just another number. Really, does society deserve to have to put up with the likes of Li’l Cee Loc?

    “1.6 percent of White men between 20 and 34 are in prison (Simpson’s figures not mine), 12 percent of Black men 20 to 34 are in prison. My people are still enslaved.” They’re your figures Simpson and they speak for themselves, don’t they? I checked out some other stats. Black people make up about 30% of the population of the United States, and 60% of the prison population. Now regardless of whom you committed your crimes against society had decided that it had earned a well-deserved rest from your activities. It had absolutely nothing to do with the colour of anybody’s skin.

    “Judge Cecil J. Mills peers over his glasses and says, ‘Well now Mr Simpson. Don’t you dare look at me like that,’” and Li’l Cee honestly doesn’t understand how the judge thinks he’s being antagonistic. But I understand it. Li’l Cee’s look is common to the streets of South-Central L.A., in particular the areas of Compton, Watts and Inglewood. And I know that because in the early eighties I worked that area as a White English cab driver. I possibly know more about those areas and the people who live in them than any other Englishman alive.

    And I’ll tell you something for nothing. They were such a miserable crowd, not giving a toss about manners, respectability or even cleanliness. Their homes were greasy, foul and noxious, their personalities were out for the count, and they never, ever smiled. The only thing that came close to a smile would be a derisory snigger or a mocking catcall. And they had such a chip on their shoulders. Always bitching about how the white man had screwed them over.

    And that may be true. Black people definitely had a raw deal in the old slavery days, but no small measure of irony creeps in here when we realize that the Moors - Muslims who eventually settled in North-West Africa - laid waste the coasts of Europe, taking slaves that were sold in the markets of Venice. In the early 9th century the Vikings took over the slave trade - the word commemorates the fate of the Slavic people - and sold them to rich Muslims in the Eastern Mediterranean. But Muslims were the world's first slave traders. I only speak the truth.

    However, the way that Black people were treated in the south of America in the 50’s and 60’s was disgusting. But Native Americans and Jews have been treated far, far worse over the centuries, and you don’t hear them whinging about it, do you?

    Coloured people really don’t do themselves any favours by turning the neighbourhoods they live in, in whatever city of the world they happen to be, into trouble spots and danger areas. It’s a well-documented fact that a large proportion of the crime in London, Paris, New York and Los Angeles is focused around the Black communities.

    Why is this? Are White people to blame? Of course not. For if that were the case then the Jewish sections in countries like Russia and Germany would also be ‘no-go’ areas where prostitution, drugs and homicide are a daily form of misery, fear and death.

    When Pulitzer prize-winning writer, Edwin Way Teale, wrote in 1953 that, “It is not races but individuals that are noble and courageous or ignoble and craven or considerate or persistent or philosophical or reasonable,” what he was really saying was that a whole race of otherwise well-adjusted, well-dressed and well-read people get the blame when a high percentage of their individuals are troublesome.

    But why are a high percentage of their individuals troublesome? I don’t know. It’s just the way they are. Lack of effective role models as parents probably has a lot to do with it. But it’s not my fault, is it?

    I’ve learned that there are a group of people, those who are so racist, so bigoted, so locked inside their own tiny little box of hate that the only way to deal with it is to accuse OTHER people of being racist.

    A small portion of the ethnic minorities living in England and the USA have such a narrow focus that, for whatever reason, they live in a permanent state of hostility towards the (quote) White race (unquote). They may well have suffered trauma and persecution, but this has warped their mind-set and psyche to such an extent that they now hold ALL White people accountable for ill treatment their ancestors may have previously suffered, ever on the look-out for any imagined sign of abuse.

    The persecuted has become so twisted that he has swapped places and is now himself the persecutor, intolerant of all White members of the community. These people who habitually fill their own minds with the rank poisons of hatred, suspicion and jealousy can get very upset at those who refuse to do likewise, and they find a perverted relief in actually accusing THEM of being racist, when of course it is the reciprocal outlook that is the truth.

    Interesting how the perspective changes with the point of view, isn’t it?

    So while this really is an excellent book and a fascinating read as we follow Simpson’s spirited, brave and it has to said foolhardy journey from Colton-to-Li’l Cee-to-Cee Loc-to-Colton again as he comes full circle and shares his campaign with us I just can’t give a racist a 5 Star.

    This is one of the best books I’ve read about the Bloods and Crips, but with regret – for I believe Simpson to be, and to have always been, a very principled human being - I can only afford it a 3 Star.

  4. says:

    A great book. I subtracted a star because much of the action seemed redundant and I skimmed a bit of it.
    Overall I really enjoy the message that the author is putting out there. The first few chapters were a very comprehensive overview of how and why young people join gangs, which is very valuable. The last few chapters also give great insight on how he got out and what needs to be done to stop gangs, violence, and drug abuse.

  5. says:

    This book should be titled "Outside the Crips" or perhaps "The Cripper in The Rye". Why? Because though he takes us through a realistic and harrowing journey through gangsterism, bloodshed, crime and a life in prison, Colton Simpson, a.k.a. C-Loc, a.k.a. Lil' Cee, never seems to "get it".

    He's a middle class kid in a gangster's world. He presents his childhood as an odd mixture of near stardom (pro baseball player dad, model mom) and downward mobility (abandoned to ghetto grandma). He grows up 'hood and becomes a loyal Crip. His crimes get him jailed and his recounting of the terror and beatings and wars inside are gripping,

    But here's the thing...I always feel like if he wanted to, he could have pulled the middle class ripcord -- like an expensive lawyer or political connection -- and gotten himself out of the mess. And I think the hilarity in this book comes from everyone else around him and in prison seeing that -- except for the protagonist, Mr. Simpson himself!

    The harder he tries to study "Cripology" the more ridiculous it gets. It's clear what Cripping is for everyone else...a way to survive. Not just a "gang of brothers" but something to hold on to in a world that is best described as anarchy during wartime. The definitions are never fixed, the rules are fluid...but Colton wants to see something that isn't there. A society, a brotherhood...but one minute that brotherhood is used for comraderie, the next for backstabbing.

    I am not condemning those people around Colton...they have nothing and no way to get it. But Colton did -- and he never takes the time except for one or two sentences to recognize this.

    But, I think I know why he did what he did. He just wasn't getting the middle class or rich kids rewards playing it straight. He found what he needed in the "Crips" (by the end of the book, you are left wondering if there really is any thing that can be defined exactly as that gang) and banging.

    I don't know if it goes any further than that, cuz...

  6. says:

    We all seem to write these redemption books. And I mean "we" as those of us who really fucked up and now want to remove ourselves from our past – you know, want people to love us, and shit. Want people to look past that person they see, or the one on paper, defined by criminal records, police reports, and court documents. We write about all the horrendous shit we did, and then put that clause in: but I have seen the evil of my ways. And that somehow makes it all okay. Washes away the sins of the past. And yeah, we've changed. To write a book, many of us have really changed, as it's akin to snitching. But then there's a tone to how one writes. And if you've not left everything behind, that stroll from the yard creeps in and you can hear it. Hell, you smell it and taste it. But then how much of the real person is really going to go away. I don't regret my past. It has formed me into the person I am today. I'm sure Cee probably feels the same way. His is an interesting true story. He co-wrote another redemption book, another memoir from bad to good.

  7. says:

    Absolutely an amazing book. From the forward by Ice T to the conclusion of afterword by Simpson himself, this book contains truly masterful language, parallelism, and symbolism. The main symbol is the comparison of life to a game of chess: those with debilitating and blinding anger and those who do not foresee the consequences of their actions will have major struggles in life. Simpson meets many wise men, formerly of the Black Panthers, during his time in prison, where he grows a surprising amount. He remains candid in defending himself from the allegations from the book. Honestly, despite his history of gangbanging, I am convinced that he is a good person. He acknowledges his shortcomings, but the positive impact and dynamicity of his character seem to overshadow those.

  8. says:

    The setting of this story is very real because it talks about what happens in their lives and life.The setting of this story is very exciting and makes the reader want to read more about other peoples life and how they do it.
    This makes me really think about how hard their lives are and why they do the things they do. It makes me think twice about the bad and violent choices i make in my day to day life.
    i really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anybody that is into gang related gun related and other violent things

  9. says:

    This book is very interesting to read, I can honestly say when I first looked at the front cover of the book I was kind of surprised because I thought to myself why is this man face so serious, is he a serial killer, is he a murderer like I was really confused but so curious on what the book was going to be about, so I started to read it almost every night, and I was just shocked about all of the conflicts and actions that were going through this mans life. Colton Simpson also known as C-Loc for his gang member name.

  10. says:

    The book, Inside The Crips, is a good book. I rated it a 5 out of 5 stars because i like books that involve shootings and gang related stuff. i enjoyed this memoir because it talks about Colton's life and what he did to join a gang. It relates to me because my brother is in a gang and its hard. I would recommend this book to any gang affiliated people and or people that are struggling with their life.

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