The Rifle

The RifleA Treasured Rifle Passed Down Through Generations Is The Cause Of A Tragic Accident In This Timely Tale With Subtle Mastery And Precision, This Tough, Thought Provoking Novel Challenges The Idea That Firearms Don T Become Instruments Of Destruction And Murder Until They Are Placed In Human Hands Each Book Includes A Reader S Guide

Although he was never a dedicated student, Paulsen developed a passion for reading at an early age After a librarian gave him a book to read along with his own library card he was hooked He began spending hours alone in the basement of his apartment building, reading one book after another Running away from home at the age of 14 and traveling with a carnival, Paulsen acquired a taste for adventure A youthful summer of rigorous chores on a farm jobs as an engineer, construction worker, ranch hand, truck driver, and sailor and two rounds of the 1,180 mile Alaskan dog sled race, the Iditarod have provided ample material from which he creates his stories.Paulsen and his wife, Ruth Wright Paulsen, an artist who has illustrated several of his books, divide their time between a home in New Mexico and a boat in the Pacific.

❮PDF / Epub❯ ☄ The Rifle ✑ Author Gary Paulsen – Hookupgoldmilf.info
  • Paperback
  • 108 pages
  • The Rifle
  • Gary Paulsen
  • English
  • 14 April 2019
  • 0152058397

10 thoughts on “The Rifle

  1. says:

    Alternative title How I Lost My Respect for Gary Paulsen.Gary Paulsen uses his usual gift of prose in this short novel, but the book isa political rant than a novel In fact, given the sheer ridiculousness of the book s central premise, it s hard to see it as anything close to a well crafted story.After painting a beautiful introduction to an amazing rifle, a several page rant that stereotypes gun owners, Paulsen concludes with an ending so ridiculously impossible that my wife had to pry Alternative title How I Lost My Respect for Gary Paulsen.Gary Paulsen uses his usual gift of prose in this short novel, but the book isa political rant than a novel In fact, given the sheer ridiculousness of the book s central premise, it s hard to see it as anything close to a well crafted story.After painting a beautiful introduction to an amazing rifle, a several page rant that stereotypes gun owners, Paulsen concludes with an ending so ridiculously impossible that my wife had to pry my jaw off the floor Spoiler Alert According to Paulsen, the rifle was left loaded for over 200 years, spending much of the time in a humid attic Somehow, he postulates, the bear fat managed to keep the black powder charge in the barrel perfectly preserved Also, in 200 years, no one checks to see if it is loaded Best of all, after years of such perfect preservation, a single spark from a fireplace manages to get into the barrel and ignite the charge When the gun fires, it goes through two windows and, with a perfect shot, kills the kid who would have cured cancer Following the ending is a reader chat page Do you still think guns don t kill people Really For those unfamiliar with black powder, leaving a charge in for a single year leads to incredible amounts of rust Humidity will destroy a charge Oh, and bear fat still works as a water barrier after 200 years Wow.Icing on the cake the cover shows a left handed rifle from a time when there were practically no left handed rifles Disappointment

  2. says:

    I liked the story but the message was trying to counter the argument that guns don t kill people, people kill people by relating a series of events that happened because of the negligence of people It would be comparable to saying that cars kill people by cited a case where somebody was killed by a car that was parked on a hill, with no e brake on, tires pointing straight, and it got bumped and started rolling down the hill when no one was in it.

  3. says:

    What could have been an interesting look at the life of an object built during the American Revolution, becomes muddled by a severely bias political message The brush Paulsen uses to paint those who actually believe in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is so broad, it s naive at best and purposely meant to indoctrinate at worst The first fifty or so pages are very well written and concisely explain what life would have been like in 1776 I possibly could have overlooked the What could have been an interesting look at the life of an object built during the American Revolution, becomes muddled by a severely bias political message The brush Paulsen uses to paint those who actually believe in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is so broad, it s naive at best and purposely meant to indoctrinate at worst The first fifty or so pages are very well written and concisely explain what life would have been like in 1776 I possibly could have overlooked the unbelievable ending if he hadn t dedicated several pages before to a rabbit trail rant about a basically unrelated right winger who briefly owns the rifle That made it obvious I wasn t supposed to take the outcome as just a horrific accident

  4. says:

    When I was in middle school my librarian introduced me to Gary Paulsen by way of Hatchet I really liked it and read several of his other books, so when I saw this book on the rack at Goodwill I snagged it and could wait to read it But, while Hatchet was a good book, in this book it is quite obvious that in The Rifle Paulsen has an ax to grind pun intended.In order to process through my disappointment with this book, I have decided to outline it here for you in general terms view spoiler I When I was in middle school my librarian introduced me to Gary Paulsen by way of Hatchet I really liked it and read several of his other books, so when I saw this book on the rack at Goodwill I snagged it and could wait to read it But, while Hatchet was a good book, in this book it is quite obvious that in The Rifle Paulsen has an ax to grind pun intended.In order to process through my disappointment with this book, I have decided to outline it here for you in general terms view spoiler I The Weapon A 25 pages in which Paulsen waxes overly detailed on black powder gun smithing One would think he was a gun enthusiast B 24 pages on how the rifle was purchased and used in the Revolutionary war More action here but basically pointless to the grand purposes of the plot C 17 pages full of crazy coincidences as to be virtually unbelievable plus 15 pages of those pages were dedicated to a straw man NRA kook This is the point at which I saw that Paulsen is anti gun and was simply writing a thinly veiled anti gun tract.II The Boy A Paulsen has to pull back from outright politicking in order to craft a character to kill off What better way to do this than talk about a boy and his dog and what he wants to be when he grows up and falling in love with the neighbor girl Melodrama by numbers.III The Joining A Wherein the author plays catch up to show how the gun was still loaded seriouslyyou re just now telling us This would have worked better methinks if he had told us her earlier He tries to justify his explanation for how the black powered could still be goodum, yeah, no B Ridiculous string of circumstances ending in a melodramatic and didactic ending.IV The Rifle A The fallout from the eventover the top B The gun is still out there and is loaded C Sowhat do you think Do people kill people or do guns kill people hide spoiler

  5. says:

    This book, The Rifle, was not a very entertaining one at all It is broken up into three parts The first is known as The Weapon, the second is called The Boy, and the finale is called The Joining The book starts with a man named Cornish making a perfect rifle, which is both beautiful and shoots perfectly He then sells it to a man named John Bryam who uses into become a legendary revolutionary war character After Bryam dies the rifle is passed down through many protagonist, however none of This book, The Rifle, was not a very entertaining one at all It is broken up into three parts The first is known as The Weapon, the second is called The Boy, and the finale is called The Joining The book starts with a man named Cornish making a perfect rifle, which is both beautiful and shoots perfectly He then sells it to a man named John Bryam who uses into become a legendary revolutionary war character After Bryam dies the rifle is passed down through many protagonist, however none of them know it s loaded Unfortunately, it eventually misfires and kills a young boy I think the worst part of this book is that the author, Gary Paulsen, spends the first twenty pages of the book talking about Cornish making the rifle This wasn t the only time Paulsen spent too much time explaining something in the book He gives several rants about things that aren t even relevant to the book For example he spends an entire part of the book talking about a character who isn t even relevant until the end I think this book wants to deliver the message that guns are evil The whole point of the book was to show how guns can harm people no matter how old they are I don t exactly think that guns are evil, so that may have added to my dislike of the book Even when I don t like a book there s usually some part of it I do enjoy, that happened with this book At the beginning of the book John Bryam sees a man being hanged and John immediately shoots the british officer who s sentencing the man to death Though this book was bad people who agree that guns are evil may enjoy this book People who enjoy sad ending or cliff hanger endings might like it, the book ends with Tilson the owner of the gun at the end of the story read an article in a gun magazine entitled Don t shun that old smoke pole, about shooting with black powder and he has been thinking seriously about getting some black powder and balls and maybe loading the rifle Just to see how it shoots And in the meantime the rifle sits in the gun cabinet Waiting pg 105

  6. says:

    I was so excited to buy and read this book The first half of this book is terrific, then it becomes boring and problematic in the middle, and concludes with a poorly written, politically motivated, unbelievable, tragic ending Do not waste your time on this book It s so disappointing I never thought I would hate a Gary Paulsen book, but this is one for the trash bin.

  7. says:

    Could have been a good book until the author used every stereotype known to man to describe people who go to gun shows Went downhill after that.

  8. says:

    I ve read this book probably about five, maybe six times over the years, and I ve browsed ittimes than I can count I first read it when I was in middle school, and recently I was gifted it by a friend, whereupon I read it twicein the span of a few days This book has a long history for me, and over the years it has come to mean much .I won t bother with a summary, because it seems as if every other review of this book has at least a paragraph dedicated to summarizing it In I ve read this book probably about five, maybe six times over the years, and I ve browsed ittimes than I can count I first read it when I was in middle school, and recently I was gifted it by a friend, whereupon I read it twicein the span of a few days This book has a long history for me, and over the years it has come to mean much .I won t bother with a summary, because it seems as if every other review of this book has at least a paragraph dedicated to summarizing it In short the novel is about a rifle and a boy, and it s still just as heart wrenchingly beautiful and sad as the first time I read it.One of the gripes many people have with this book is that it s short and it s fast The pages are small and the text is large, but somehow that only adds to the experience of reading it Unlike so many books nowadays it s easy to get into and easy to finish, and a lot of people mistake this to mean that The Rifle is a simple book, meant for children I would and do argue vigorously against this It might be small, but I haven t read a work of Paulsen s that doesn t deal with themes adults need to address as much as children If you re reading in broad strokes, then the novel is about gun safety, the value of history and well honed craft, and the brief, sharp tragedy of chance But the beauty of the book is in the details It s short and compact but there is some kind of well built strength in every sentence, every paragraph It s as if Paulsen took the same care in assembling this book that Cornish McManaus, the gunsmith who built The Rifle, did in assembling his masterpiece His visual detail, though spare, is all well applied he s a master of letting the reader fill in the gaps, although this assumes that the reader is of a certain background and will have those experiences to draw on He builds characters in mere paragraphs, fleshes them out in a couple of pages And he is capable of making you care about those characters, if you let yourself Yes, there are stereotypes, but I m willing to let them pass without comment some stereotypes do have a basis in reality And though the true beauty of this book is that it is all equally beautiful, my personal favorite section has to be The Boy.Nowhere have I grown to grow to care about characters so quickly The boy is never even named, never described beyond a sketch, and grows up through a period of fewer than fifteen pages from the age of one month to adolescence but I know him, I feel for him, and though I won t spoil the book by saying what happens I was brought low by the ending Paulsen does such an amazing job guiding the reader through the boy s interests, his struggles, his friends his pets that in only those few pages I came to carethan I have for many characters in other, much longer novels.Much of my appreciation for this book is newly found, I ll admit It s only now that I ve done some growing up that I can really see everything that Paulsen was getting at, and when I was the same age as this boy I wasn t as inclined to think of his character as memorable or even significant But now that I m older and I can look back with some time between me and him, I can see just how masterful Paulsen was in writing the way he did, and I can t say this strongly enough read this book You may regret it, you may not like it, or it may just not be for you but if it is, and if you like it, then it just might become as significant for you as it was for me

  9. says:

    Dear students,I love your love for Gary Paulsen books and I promise to read the entire Hatchet series soon However, I have no idea what Paulsen was thinking when writing this book for you To begin, the first 30 pages go into painfully boring details about how to make a rifle, with explanations and vocabulary I doubt many would understand I certainly didn t While I enjoyed the middle section, in which the Revolutionary War was discussed, the ending of this short novel was absolutely terrible Dear students,I love your love for Gary Paulsen books and I promise to read the entire Hatchet series soon However, I have no idea what Paulsen was thinking when writing this book for you To begin, the first 30 pages go into painfully boring details about how to make a rifle, with explanations and vocabulary I doubt many would understand I certainly didn t While I enjoyed the middle section, in which the Revolutionary War was discussed, the ending of this short novel was absolutely terrible and sad and hard to read Students, Paulsen got it so so wrong with this one for you.Sincerely,Your 7th grade ELA teacher

  10. says:

    The Rifle is an amazing book about a rifle built with the most extraordinary amount of care in 1768 by a Gunsmith who goes by the name of Cornish McManus At the time, the majority of guns wouldn t fire very accurately but this gone was different This rifle was so accurate in fact that it was the weapon of choice for John Bryam a legendary sharpshooter from the American Revolution Overtime the gun was passed from person to person, until it eventually came into the hands of a person The Rifle is an amazing book about a rifle built with the most extraordinary amount of care in 1768 by a Gunsmith who goes by the name of Cornish McManus At the time, the majority of guns wouldn t fire very accurately but this gone was different This rifle was so accurate in fact that it was the weapon of choice for John Bryam a legendary sharpshooter from the American Revolution Overtime the gun was passed from person to person, until it eventually came into the hands of a person residing in the present day Even though the gun passed through so many people, not one person out of the hundreds who held it checked to see if the gun was loaded But a very unlucky family would soon find out The Rifle is one of my all time favorite books, among others that Gary Paulsen has written This book will make you take a second look at everything that passes through your hands and you will see the potential of things that you previously saw as worthless

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